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Date
Title
Source
Description
Tags
-4989
28.08.2012
Food Sluice - Ulrike Möntmann
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FOOD SLUICE The literal reference of the Food Sluice is to a way of channelling food. Following the principle of a sluice, the flow of food between two spaces is regulated, without there ever being a direct, open connection between these spaces. Un ...

FOOD SLUICE

The literal reference of the Food Sluice is to a way of channelling food. Following the principle of a sluice, the flow of food between two spaces is regulated, without there ever being a direct, open connection between these spaces.

Unrealized project concept 2007 FOOD SLUICE The literal reference of the Food Sluice is to a way of channelling food. Following the principle of a sluice, the flow of food between two spaces is regulated, without there ever being a direct, open connection between these spaces. The total area consists of three sections: dining-room, kitchen and a central space in between the two. The dining-room is accessible to the public, the kitchen is accessible to staff, and the central, linking space is used for the conveyance of meals. The Food Sluice symbolises diverse, irreconcilable sections of society within a particular community. 2 [SKETCH, LUCAS LENGLET] A sluice divides a space in two, in this case separating the dining-room off from the kitchen. It is a compact space, divided into illuminated cells with entrances on both sides that can be closed off. The cell doors bear codes corresponding to those issued to the diner with his or her order. As usual with a sluice, the doors open temporarily in one direction only. The restaurant is furnished in contemporary style and is perfectly equipped for a superior location. There are no staff in the dining-room. Clients order and pay for their meals electronically; they do so using a machine installed in the restaurant, entering specific codes and collecting the corresponding meals from the sluice. The dining-room is transparent, so that passers-by can see the diners from the street. The range and quality of the meals on the menu are excellent, while prices are significantly lower than those in other comparable catering establishments. The rear area is divided into an operating system and a kitchen. The operating system mediates between clients and their host; this is where orders are received and processed. The staff cannot be seen from the dining-room; the space is constructed such as to prevent any contact between clients and staff. The personnel consists of a rotating team of chefs and an auxiliary staff. Access to the kitchen is solely through a separate staff entrance. The dining-room is unlike more traditional restaurants in that the usual code of conduct within the culture of dining does not apply; the usual identification of clients with their host, and vice versa, is entirely absent. In spite of this, the style and ambience of the dining-room meet the demands and 3 expectations of a broad, culturally savvy, section of the European population. The visitors to the Food Sluice are restaurant clients with an interest in the prevailing culture of dining out, who like to combine social and business engagements with having an enjoyable meal in pleasant surroundings. The ʻhostʼ in the Food Sluice is a section of the population that is generally excluded from mainstream society. Groups of detainees and ex-detainees, addicts and former addicts, prepare the meals under the supervision of a team of chefs.

FOOD SLUICE The literal reference of the Food Sluice is to a way of channelling food. Following the principle of a sluice, the flow of food between two spaces is regulated, without there ever being a direct, open connection between these spaces. Un ...

FOOD SLUICE

The literal reference of the Food Sluice is to a way of channelling food. Following the principle of a sluice, the flow of food between two spaces is regulated, without there ever being a direct, open connection between these spaces.

Unrealized project concept 2007 FOOD SLUICE The literal reference of the Food Sluice is to a way of channelling food. Following the principle of a sluice, the flow of food between two spaces is regulated, without there ever being a direct, open connection between these spaces. The total area consists of three sections: dining-room, kitchen and a central space in between the two. The dining-room is accessible to the public, the kitchen is accessible to staff, and the central, linking space is used for the conveyance of meals. The Food Sluice symbolises diverse, irreconcilable sections of society within a particular community. 2 [SKETCH, LUCAS LENGLET] A sluice divides a space in two, in this case separating the dining-room off from the kitchen. It is a compact space, divided into illuminated cells with entrances on both sides that can be closed off. The cell doors bear codes corresponding to those issued to the diner with his or her order. As usual with a sluice, the doors open temporarily in one direction only. The restaurant is furnished in contemporary style and is perfectly equipped for a superior location. There are no staff in the dining-room. Clients order and pay for their meals electronically; they do so using a machine installed in the restaurant, entering specific codes and collecting the corresponding meals from the sluice. The dining-room is transparent, so that passers-by can see the diners from the street. The range and quality of the meals on the menu are excellent, while prices are significantly lower than those in other comparable catering establishments. The rear area is divided into an operating system and a kitchen. The operating system mediates between clients and their host; this is where orders are received and processed. The staff cannot be seen from the dining-room; the space is constructed such as to prevent any contact between clients and staff. The personnel consists of a rotating team of chefs and an auxiliary staff. Access to the kitchen is solely through a separate staff entrance. The dining-room is unlike more traditional restaurants in that the usual code of conduct within the culture of dining does not apply; the usual identification of clients with their host, and vice versa, is entirely absent. In spite of this, the style and ambience of the dining-room meet the demands and 3 expectations of a broad, culturally savvy, section of the European population. The visitors to the Food Sluice are restaurant clients with an interest in the prevailing culture of dining out, who like to combine social and business engagements with having an enjoyable meal in pleasant surroundings. The ʻhostʼ in the Food Sluice is a section of the population that is generally excluded from mainstream society. Groups of detainees and ex-detainees, addicts and former addicts, prepare the meals under the supervision of a team of chefs.