#
Date
Title
Source
Description
Tags
-3664
15.05.2011
Universal Boogie Woogie - Irene Judong
-
  • Universal Boogie Woogie ‘Art All-Around’ visualization, Portland, USA 2008 This is the working title of the design for the ‘Art All-Around’ visualization. The basic concept for this design relies on a system of contradictive thinking. S ...

    Universal Boogie Woogie ‘Art All-Around’ visualization, Portland, USA 2008

    This is the working title of the design for the ‘Art All-Around’ visualization.

    The basic concept for this design relies on a system of contradictive thinking. Seeing that, on the one hand, the lines playfully express oneself in an overall easy-going and stylish manner, being that they are quite simple, but on the other hand they play an intriguing game of creating space, laid out for everyone to see and explore. The images exist in a simple complexity, yet they’re completely free of any trend. A slight comparison with Mondrian’s ‘Broadway Boogie-Woogie’ is possible, maybe even essential, but here, in this case the lines move in a certain nomadic way, it gifs us an ongoing space-experience, an analogical agreement with the all-around reality of the tanks.

    In front of this reality I have put a central one-eye-viewpoint perspective with ongoing flight-lines turning back to the starting point. There is no visible horizontal line present because an important part of the concept is the use of the ever-present horizon in the landscape, thus creating a feeling of ‘attachment’ and ‘belonging’.

    The carefully chosen perspective lines create an illusion of dept in a two-dimensional and abstract manner, almost like the design of an architect, even more, like nature and rhizome-structures or rootstocks. The beholder can’t understand it immediately: ‘perception’ is an open process, on which the interpretation can bring an unexpected turn. Nobody can expect a directly, efficient assimilation of the significant material and have sensorial experiences and impressions, provisional and equivalent turned up in the memory. It is a constantly open minded interpretation as the result of the missing synthesis. So, it takes time to understand. Although it’s a powerful way of working, it involves a minimal use of tools and techniques to ‘touch space’ and to create a convincing effect. The contradiction is laying in the fact that the work is ‘artificial’ and yet a firm part of the tank.

    The visual movements of the lines in vivid colors invite the viewer to explore, further and faster, until, in a manner of speaking, the story ends… or begins again, he/she has gone full circle.

    The lines itself leads us to what’s hiding on the inside of the tank, while on the roof the image seems to come out. The circles and ellipses are essential here, giving us a kind of ‘conclusion’ to the ‘question’-image on the side poses. The used colors reminds vaguely on Mondrian’s works and the white background act like a drawing-paper. In this concept, pure color is, like in nature, not the issue, but the ‘Art All-Around’ visualization.

    The signification of ‘Universal Boogie Woogie’ is to rise above the locale to the universal vision and from the classicism and modernism in contemporary mental state of arts.

    Irene Judong June 24, 2008 Hasselt, Belgium

    Universal Boogie Woogie ‘Art All-Around’ visualization, Portland, USA 2008 This is the working title of the design for the ‘Art All-Around’ visualization. The basic concept for this design relies on a system of contradictive thinking. S ...

    Universal Boogie Woogie ‘Art All-Around’ visualization, Portland, USA 2008

    This is the working title of the design for the ‘Art All-Around’ visualization.

    The basic concept for this design relies on a system of contradictive thinking. Seeing that, on the one hand, the lines playfully express oneself in an overall easy-going and stylish manner, being that they are quite simple, but on the other hand they play an intriguing game of creating space, laid out for everyone to see and explore. The images exist in a simple complexity, yet they’re completely free of any trend. A slight comparison with Mondrian’s ‘Broadway Boogie-Woogie’ is possible, maybe even essential, but here, in this case the lines move in a certain nomadic way, it gifs us an ongoing space-experience, an analogical agreement with the all-around reality of the tanks.

    In front of this reality I have put a central one-eye-viewpoint perspective with ongoing flight-lines turning back to the starting point. There is no visible horizontal line present because an important part of the concept is the use of the ever-present horizon in the landscape, thus creating a feeling of ‘attachment’ and ‘belonging’.

    The carefully chosen perspective lines create an illusion of dept in a two-dimensional and abstract manner, almost like the design of an architect, even more, like nature and rhizome-structures or rootstocks. The beholder can’t understand it immediately: ‘perception’ is an open process, on which the interpretation can bring an unexpected turn. Nobody can expect a directly, efficient assimilation of the significant material and have sensorial experiences and impressions, provisional and equivalent turned up in the memory. It is a constantly open minded interpretation as the result of the missing synthesis. So, it takes time to understand. Although it’s a powerful way of working, it involves a minimal use of tools and techniques to ‘touch space’ and to create a convincing effect. The contradiction is laying in the fact that the work is ‘artificial’ and yet a firm part of the tank.

    The visual movements of the lines in vivid colors invite the viewer to explore, further and faster, until, in a manner of speaking, the story ends… or begins again, he/she has gone full circle.

    The lines itself leads us to what’s hiding on the inside of the tank, while on the roof the image seems to come out. The circles and ellipses are essential here, giving us a kind of ‘conclusion’ to the ‘question’-image on the side poses. The used colors reminds vaguely on Mondrian’s works and the white background act like a drawing-paper. In this concept, pure color is, like in nature, not the issue, but the ‘Art All-Around’ visualization.

    The signification of ‘Universal Boogie Woogie’ is to rise above the locale to the universal vision and from the classicism and modernism in contemporary mental state of arts.

    Irene Judong June 24, 2008 Hasselt, Belgium